Virginia Social Worker License Guide - 2022

Social Worker Licensing Guide for the state of Virginia

Last Reviewed: October 3rd, 2022

Social work is a great career to pursue if you have a real passion to help others. Providing assistance to underserved communities and individuals or families who are having trouble coping with life’s daily challenges are just a few of the areas social workers can be found. They address issues dealing with mental health, mental and physical disabilities, and elderly care.

Virginia Social Work License Options



It’s not an easy job as social workers usually encounter people when they’re at a low point in life. Restoring and enhancing the well-being of others is a goal all social workers strive to achieve, and Virginia is a great state to start your career.

Because the state is close to the nation’s capital, Virginia social workers have access to many useful organizations and national resources. There are also a number of job opportunities in different government agencies where a social worker can make a difference.

If you are a person who enjoys seeing others succeed in the face of hardship, and you have an empathetic nature, social work is a field that needs people like you. This guide will give you a general idea of what is needed to get started on a journey to social work licensure in Virginia.

Process of Licensure

You can begin your social work career in Virginia with a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree. This is the entry-level licensure that allows you to practice general social work services. Most programs take four years to complete and then the BSW holder can apply to become a Licensed Baccalaureate Social Worker (LBSW).

Virginia offers two higher levels of licensure which require a Master of Social Work (MSW) or doctoral degree in social work. MSW programs in Virginia include a clinical course of education with practicum options of at least 900 hours. For those who apply for the highest level of licensure, the Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) needs a minimum of 600 practicum hours with a concentration on prevention, treatment, and diagnoses.